Size Matters: Astronomers Discover Rare, 'Super Spiral' Galaxies

A team of astronomers has recently discovered a total of 53 'super spiral' galaxies which are enormous in size, three of which are shown in the image above. The galaxies shown at the left and center images also exhibit a double nucleus, which could be the result of a past galactic merger. Image Credit: Sloan Digital Sky Survey

A team of astronomers has recently discovered a total of 53 ‘super spiral’ galaxies which are enormous in size, three of which are shown in the image above. The galaxies shown at the left and center images also exhibit a double nucleus, which could be the result of a past galactic merger. Image Credit: Sloan Digital Sky Survey

One of the essential aspects of astronomy is that of classification. Whatever their type, celestial objects are mainly categorised according to their basic properties like their size, mass, and brightness. For instance, on the realm of planetary bodies there are objects as small as Ceres and Pluto in our own Solar System as well as exoplanets with two times the size of Jupiter that have been found in orbit around other stars. The latter also exhibit a wide range of masses and sizes from 1/10 to more than a thousand times that of the Sun. When it comes to the specimens of the galactic zoo, these fall under three different categories: spiral, elliptical and irregular galaxies which similarly exhibit a wide range of sizes, with the biggest ones that had been found to date spanning more than 200,000 light-years across—twice that of our own galaxy, the Milky Way. Recently, astronomers were able to shatter this long-held record by announcing the unexpected discovery of a new population of galactic beasts, consisting of gigantic spiral galaxies that are up to four times larger than the Milky Way. In addition to their ‘wow’ factor, these ‘super spirals’ represent a challenge for astronomers in their efforts to determine how, contrary to theoretical models, these monstrous stellar cities can grow to such enormous sizes.

One of the major open questions in cosmology and astrophysics today, is the formation and evolution of galaxies. Despite the great strides that have taken place in the study of galaxies and galactic clusters during the last couple of decades with the help of ground and space-based observatories, the exact physical processes with which the first structures in the primordial Universe formed and later evolved in order to create the large diversity of galaxies that is observable today, remains an actively debated topic among astronomers. According to the standard model of cosmology, minuscule, random density fluctuations in the otherwise uniform distribution of matter in the early Universe were the seeds that gave rise to the great variety of structure that exists on a cosmic scale today. Yet, the specific mechanisms that have driven this process are currently unknown. One hypothesis, known as the ‘top-down scenario’, posits that the hydrogen gas that dominated the early Universe had coalesced to form gigantic gas clouds which eventually collapsed and fragmented under their own gravity into smaller clumps of matter – the protogalaxies. With the passage of cosmic time these primordial, baby galaxies grew bigger, eventually giving rise to the large, fully grown galaxies of all shapes and sizes that we see today. On the other hand, a competing hypothesis which has gained much traction in recent years, known as the ‘bottom-up scenario’, postulates that the first galaxies formed directly from the primordial density fluctuations and through the process of colliding and merging with one another they led to the development of the large-scale structures that characterise the Universe today.

During the 1920's astronomer Edwin Hubble devised the now infamous galaxy classification scheme, also known as the Hubble Tuning Fork, which categorised galaxy's according to their shape into spirals, ellipticals and irregulars. The exact mechanisms with which galaxies have evolved into these distinct shapes remain a mystery to this day. Image Credit: Galaxy Zoo

During the 1920’s astronomer Edwin Hubble devised the now infamous galaxy classification scheme, also known as the Hubble Tuning Fork, which categorised galaxies according to their shape into spirals, ellipticals and irregulars. The exact mechanisms with which galaxies have evolved into these distinct shapes remain a mystery to this day. Image Credit: Galaxy Zoo

Whatever the exact path was that the Universe chose for the evolution of its constituent stars and galaxies, theoretical predictions have shown that galaxies could only grow to a certain extent, before eventually depleting their gas and dust through star formation. More specifically spiral galaxies, which are named for the spiral arms that extend outward from their center and are rich in young, newly formed blue-white stars as well as huge reservoirs of cold gas and dust, are the places in the Universe where active star formation takes place. Depending on the amount of gas and dust that is available in their spiral arms, spiral galaxies have star-formation rates which range from 1-3 solar masses per year in the case of the Milky Way, to 10 times higher in the case of the so-called ‘starburst’ galaxies like M82. Yet, spiral galaxies can’t hold these rates forever. Eventually their gas and dust runs out, at which point it has been generally hypothesised that their spiral arms slowly fade and star formation comes to a stop. It is thought that this shutting-off of star-formation in spiral galaxies also marks the point where the latter transition towards ellipticals, which are characterised by the presence of aging red stars and are devoid of any gas and dust.

Star formation inside a galaxy can be halted by a host of other processes as well if their reservoirs of cold gas and dust for instance gets expelled from the spiral arms as a result of galaxy collisions, or if it is abruptly heated and compressed by supernovae explosions or from ram-pressure stripping, which results from the galaxy’s movement through the intergalactic medium inside galaxy clusters. These gas-stripping mechanisms are also responsible for limiting the growth of spiral galaxies, leaving galaxy mergers as the dominant process of galaxy evolution with the passage of cosmic time.

Four out of the 53 newly found super spiral galaxies exhibit a double nucleus, which could signify different stages of galactic merger events. (a) Possible collision in progress of two spirals. (b) Possible collision or merger of two spirals, also a brightest cluster galaxy. (c) High-surface brightness disk with possible double AGN, with faint outer arms. The nucleus at the center is classied as an SDSS QSO. (d) Possible late-stage major merger with two stellar bulges, with a striking grand spiral design surrounding both nuclei. Image Credit: Sloan Digital Sky Survey

Four out of the 53 newly found super spiral galaxies exhibit a double nucleus, which could signify different stages of galactic merger events. (a) Possible collision in progress of two spirals. (b) Possible collision or merger of two spirals, also a brightest cluster galaxy. (c) High-surface brightness disk with possible double AGN, with faint outer arms. The nucleus at the center is classi ed as an SDSS QSO. (d) Possible late-stage major merger with two stellar bulges, with a striking grand spiral design surrounding both nuclei. Image Credit: Sloan Digital Sky Survey

Wanting to shed more light to the processes that drive galactic evolution, a research team led by Patrick Ogle, a professor of astrophysics at the California Institute of Technology, went through the archival data of the NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database, or NED for short, with the goal of identifying the most massive and luminous galaxies that are located more than 1 billion light-years away. Funded and operated by NASA and Caltech’s Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, or IPAC, respectively, NED is a large online database which consists of multi-wavelength data for more than 200 million extragalactic objects that have been gathered by a series of different projects and space missions, like NASA’s IRAS and GALEX satellites as well as the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the 2-Micron All-Sky Survey among others.

By far, some of the most massive and luminous galaxies known to date are ellipticals. Even though they are composed of old red stars and have long stopped forming new ones, elliptical galaxies can nevertheless grow to supergiant status, like the famous M87 in the constellation Virgo which has a diameter of approximately one million light-years—10 times greater than that of the Milky Way. Ogle and colleagues expected to only find similar supergiants like M87 in a sample of nearly 800,000 galaxies that they extracted from the NED database for their research. Yet, to their surprise, their search revealed a total of 53 spiral galaxies with sizes and luminosities that by far exceeded that of spirals like our own. Dubbed ‘super spirals’ by the researchers, these newly found behemoths which lie between 1.2 and 3.5 billion light-years away, were found to be eight and fourteen times brighter than the Milky Way while also exhibiting a star formation rate that was up to 30 times higher. Most impressively, the diameter of the biggest one among them is a whopping 440,000 light-years across, making it by far the biggest known spiral galaxy to date. “We have found a previously unrecognized class of spiral galaxies that are as luminous and massive as the biggest, brightest  [elliptical] galaxies we know of,” says Ogle. “It’s as if we have just discovered a new land animal stomping around that is the size of an elephant but had shockingly gone unnoticed by zoologists.”

The giant elliptical galaxy M87 as seen from the Hubble Space Telescope. With a diameter of approximately 1 million light-years, M87 is 10 times bigger than our own galaxy. The discovery of 'super spirals' shows that spiral galaxies can also grow to enormous sizes. Image Credit: NASA, ESA, and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)

The giant elliptical galaxy M87 as seen from the Hubble Space Telescope. With a diameter of approximately 1 million light-years, M87 is 10 times bigger than our own galaxy. The discovery of ‘super spirals’ shows that spiral galaxies can also grow to enormous sizes. Image Credit: NASA, ESA, and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)

One of the things that stands out regarding these newly found super spiral galaxies, is the strange fact that four of them appear to have two galactic nuclei, making them look like two egg yolks in a frying pan, similar to what has also been observed in recent years in a handful of much smaller spirals. Could this be evidence of an ongoing galaxy merger? If so, that would run counter to the view galactic mergers as cosmic train wrecks where participating galaxies are generally severely deformed, often resulting to spiral galaxies being stripped off their spiral arms and settling into their new life as ellipticals. Nevertheless, according to Ogle’s team, this new population of super spirals may be the missing link between the massive members of both galaxy types. “Super spirals display a range of morphologies, from flocculent to grand-design spiral patterns”, write the researchers in their study which was published at The Astrophysical Journal. “At least 9 super spirals have prominent stellar bars visible in the SDSS images. There are morphological peculiarities in several cases, including one-arm spirals, multi-arm spirals, rings, and asymmetric spiral structure. These types of features may indicate past or ongoing galaxy mergers or collisions … We suggest that super spirals may be the progenitors of red and dead lenticular galaxies of similar mass”.

Whatever the case may be, the finding of just 53 such galaxies out of a total of 800,000 suggests that super spirals are extremely rare specimens in the wider population of the galactic zoo. Nevertheless, theoretical models of galactic evolution will need to be revised in order to account for the presence of even such a small sample, since it was thought that spiral galaxies in general could not grow to such sizes. Furthermore, the discovery of spiral galaxies with two apparently distinct cores could shed more light to the dynamics of galactic mergers, which remains a dominant process in the Universe today. “Super spirals could fundamentally change our understanding of the formation and evolution of the most massive galaxies,” says Ogle. “We have much to learn from these newly identified, galactic leviathans.”

In this regard, the discovery by Ogle’s team is just the start. With more than 200 million extragalactic objects listed in its database, NED is a treasure trove of data for astronomers to analyse further, that could be full of more such fascinating surprises in the future. “Remarkably, the finding of super spiral galaxies came out of purely analyzing the contents of the NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database, thus reaping the benefits of the careful, systematic merging of data from many sources on the same galaxies,” says George Helou, Executive Director for IPAC and member of Ogle’s team. “NED is surely holding many more such nuggets of information, and it is up to us scientists to ask the right questions to bring them out.”

If such exciting discoveries are the product of past astronomical surveys and space missions, one can’t help but be excited for what the future may bring, when the next-generation of ground- and space-based observatories will come online within the next five years.

 

Be sure to “Like” AmericaSpace on Facebook and follow us on Twitter: @AmericaSpace

8 comments to Size Matters: Astronomers Discover Rare, ‘Super Spiral’ Galaxies

  • Pedro Gonzalez

    “… 200 million extragalactic objects …”

    “… 53 such galaxies out of a total of 800,000 [galaxies] …”

    What are the other 199.2 million objects?

  • Leonidas Papadopoulos

    Pedro, the entire NED catalog consists of hundreds of millions of extragalactic objects, including quasars, blazars and galaxies of all shapes and sizes just to name a few. The scientists in the study focused specifically on identifying the most massive and bright galaxies in the local Universe, out to a few billion light-years away. To that end, the put certain fliters while searching through the NED database, one of which was what is known in astronomy as the luminosity function of galaxies – an indicator of how bright they appear according to the distribution of their stars. In the specific study, the scientists wanted to look for galaxies whose luminosity function was several times greater than that of the Milky Way.

    One other filter that the scientists used to narrow down their search was the galaxies’ luminosity in ultraviolet wavelengths, the part of the electromagnetic spectrum where spiral galaxies that undergo intense star formation are brighter.

    All said, the researchers ended up with a sample of 797,729 extragalactic objects which satisfied their search criteria, out of which they discovered the 53 ‘super spiral’ galaxies that they detail in their study.

    Hope that helps!

  • I think about the number of galaxies mentioned (800,000) and the “53” in this study and lcannot help to conclude that not only microbial, but intelligent life is out there. The shame is that our current technology is currently so limited in finding out right now this eventual discovery. Mind boggling and humbling!

    • Leonidas Papadopoulos

      That’s very true Tom! One of the reasons why I really love astronomy and cosmology, is because they touch upon the Big Questions of existence. Mind-boggling and humbling indeed!

  • Pedro Gonzalez

    Leonidas,

    Thank you for your response, but you didn’t address my question. If the database contains 200 million extragalactic objects and only 800,000 are galaxies, what are the other objects? There can’t be 199.2 million quasars and blazars if there’s only 800,000 galaxies.

    Are the other objects individual stars within galaxies? That seems an extraordinarily high number of extragalactic stars that have been observed individually.

    • Leonidas Papadopoulos

      Hello Pedro,

      Half of the identified objects in the NED database (as of February 2016) are individual galaxies (just over 100 million), as detailed in the link below which categorises the objects by type (see Table 2 named “Object Type Distribution”):

      http://ned.ipac.caltech.edu/help/ned_holdings.html

      As you can see, the rest are various types of objects like entire galaxy clusters, quasars and other point sources in the sky many of which are uncategorised to this date. (The database also lists about 100,000 stars in the Milky Way).

      Of the individual galaxies listed in the database, not all of them have established spectroscopic redshifts, or have been imaged in detail. Ogle’s team only searched for those galaxies according to their search criteria whose distances had been accurately determined.

      Kind regards.

  • Pedro Gonzalez

    Leonidas,

    Thank you again! I now understand how the numbers work out.

    Unfortunately that link doesn’t work for me.

    “This site can’t be reached
    ned.pac.caltech.edu’s server DNS address could not be found.”

    • Leonidas Papadopoulos

      Due to a bug on our web site layout, the link unfortunately wasn’t copied correctly in my reply. Click here, hopefully it will re-direct you to the correct NED page. If not, we apologise for the inconvenience, we’re currently trying to work out the kinks.