Good Falcon 9 Test Fire Paves Way For Telstar 19 VANTAGE Launch From Florida Sunday

Telstar 19 VANTAGE shown in antenna testing at SSL in Palo Alto, Calif, before it was shipped to Cape Canaveral AFS. Photo: SSL / Telesat

With a successful test fire today of a SpaceX Falcon 9 ‘Block 5’ rocket at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida, it’s all system GO for launch of the next in a new generation of Telesat VANTAGE communication satellites called Telstar 19 VANTAGE. Liftoff from Launch Complex-40 is currently targeting July 22 at 1:50 a.m. EDT (05:50 UTC), with the launch window extending to 5:50 a.m. EDT. A backup launch date is scheduled for July 23 if needed.

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Blue Origin Launches Crew Capsule on Critical Escape Motor Test at Highest Altitude Yet

Blue Origin’s ‘New Shepherd 2.0’ crew capsule fires its escape motor at 390,000 feet, seconds after separating from its suborbital rocket, in its highest flight yet on July 18, 2018. Photo Credit: Blue Origin

Blue Origin just pulled off another successful flight test this morning, launching their ‘New Shepherd 2.0’ crew capsule on a critical high-altitude escape motor test to ensure astronauts can get away from an anomaly with the rocket at any time during flight. 

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'About Once a Day': Remembering the Dual Launches of Apollo-Soyuz

Tom Stafford (right) shakes hands with his counterpart Alexei Leonov in the docking module tunnel on 17 July 1975. This grainy image represents the first serious effort at co-operation between the United States and Russia in human space exploration. Photo Credit: NASA

In spite of political differences, the United States and Russia have enjoyed more than two decades of continuous collaboration, high above the Home Planet, through the shuttle-Mir effort and 20 years of International Space Station (ISS) operations. Against many odds, these two superpowers—which once (and still do) view each other with mistrust through the lens of differing political ideologies—have forged an enduring partnership in low-Earth orbit. Yet the seeds of that partnership had been laid many years before shuttle-Mir or the ISS, back in July 1975, when America and the then-Soviet Union emerged briefly from the “deep cold” of the Cold War and staged a manned space mission together. Even today, the “Apollo-Soyuz Test Project” (ASTP) remains one of the most remarkable endeavors of international co-operation ever undertaken.

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Historic Dual Pads of Launch Complex 17 Demolished, After 300+ Launches over 50 Years of Service

The towers of Launch Complex 17 pads A and B crashing down at Cape Canaveral AFS in Florida on July 12, 2018. Photo Credit: Mike Killian / AmericaSpace.com

After first echoing to the roar of rocket engines in 1957—before the Space Age even began—historic Space Launch Complex (SLC)-17 near the southern end of Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla., breathed its last earlier today (Thursday, 12 July), when shortly after 7:00 a.m. EDT its two nearly 200-foot-tall gantries were remotely destroyed. Brig. Gen. Wayne Monteith, commander of the Air Force’s 45th Space Wing, initiated detonations of 68 pounds of explosives which brought SLC-17A and SLC 17B to the ground after a combined 325 launches in more than five decades of active service. During their storied careers, the two pads hosted the first successful low-orbiting weather satellite, Britain’s maiden satellite, the world’s earliest communications satellites, GPS satellites, as well as NASA space telescopes and Mars Rovers.

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Kepler Enters Hibernation Mode, Downlinks Latest Science Data Before Fuel Runs Out

Artist’s conception of the Kepler Space Telescope in space. Fuel is now running very low and the spacecraft has downlinked its latest science data to Earth. Image Credit: NASA/AP

The end is nigh – that appears to be the case at least for NASA’s Kepler Space Telescope which is now running very low on remaining fuel. Although this has always been expected and planned for, the Kepler team received a new notification this past week that the fuel level is now critically low. As a result, the spacecraft has now been temporarily “put to sleep” – a hibernation mode to help conserve what fuel remains while the latest science data is downlinked to Earth. It is expected that Kepler only has a few months left at most to keep searching for exoplanets; along with other telescopes, Kepler has revolutionized the study of those distant worlds orbiting other stars, discovering thousands of new exoplanets, with many more still awaiting discovery.

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Summer of the Shuttle: Remembering the Ill-Fated Summer of '84

An ominous cloud of smoke billows away from Pad 39A in the seconds after a problematic Main Engine Start on 26 June 1984. Photo Credit: NASA

More than 30 summers ago, America’s shuttle program should have entered its prime. Touted for over a decade as capable of flying regularly and routinely, the early summer of 1984 was envisaged to see as many as three missions by Discovery and Challenger—two laden with scientific and technological payloads, the third a classified voyage on behalf of the Department of Defense—as the reusable fleet of orbiters transitioned from test-flights to full operations. In three years of shuttle operations, the ships had demonstrated their abilities to serve as scientific research platforms, satellite launching pads and could retrieve and repair damaged spacecraft. The future seemed bright.

That is, until the morning of 26 June 1984.

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Delta-IV Heavy Undergoing Wet Dress Rehearsals as Parker Solar Probe Nears August 4 Launch

A United Launch Alliance (ULA) Delta-IV Heavy underling a Wet Dress Rehearsal on Space Launch Complex 37B for NASA’s upcoming Parker Solar Probe launch, slated for no earlier than August 4, 2018. Photo Credit: ULA

The United Launch Alliance (ULA) rocket slated to launch humanity’s first mission to ‘touch’ a star is spending this week undergoing critical pre-flight testing with two Wet Dress Rehearsals (WDR), or practice countdowns, at Space Launch Complex 37 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida, to ensure everything is GO for a launch attempt next month with NASA’s Parker Solar Probe spacecraft.

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SpaceX Turns Focus to Vandenberg for Twilight Launch with Iridium-7 NET July 20

Launch of Iridium-4 from Vandenberg AFB, California. Photo: SpaceX

Up next on the U.S. space launch manifest is another SpaceX mission, and another twilight one at that, scheduled to fly atop a ‘Block 5’ Falcon 9 rocket from Vandenberg Air Force Base in southern California as soon as July 20 with the seventh batch of Iridium NEXT satellites. Liftoff of Iridium-7 is currently scheduled for 5:12 a.m. PDT (12:12 UTC) from Space Launch Complex 4E, about 10 minutes after the first light of dawn appears on the eastern horizon.

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Dragon Captured Over Canada, CRS-15 Arrives with New Science for Space Station

The SpaceX Dragon CRS-15 cargo ship approaches the ISS while traversing Egypt’s Nile delta on July 2, 2018. NASA astronaut Ricky Arnold captured the Dragon shortly after over Quebec, Canada. Photo: NASA/astronaut Ricky Arnold (@Astro_Ricky on Twitter)

A reused SpaceX Dragon cargo ship, flying its second mission, arrived at the International Space Station (ISS) again this morning, following a stunning dawn launch from Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida on June 29. Soaring at 17,500 miles per hour, more than 256 miles over Quebec, Canada, NASA astronauts Ricky Arnold and Drew Feustel captured Dragon at 6:54 a.m. EDT using the station’s Canadarm2 robotic arm, while NASA astronaut Serena Auñón-Chancellor kept watch over the spacecraft’s systems.

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A Sore Head: Americans in Space on Independence Day

On 4 July 1982, the crew of STS-4 became the first U.S. astronauts to spend Independence Day in space. It also marked the date of their spectacular return to Edwards Air Force Base, Calif. Photo Credit: NASA

For almost two decades, the Fourth of July—that most quintessential day of celebration in the United States—has seen at least one American citizen off the planet, aboard the International Space Station (ISS). This year, astronauts Drew Feustel, Ricky Arnold and Serena Auñón-Chancellor will observe the 242nd anniversary of the Declaration of Independence from their orbital perch, 250 miles (400 km) above Earth. Yet before the era of continuous ISS habitation, several shuttle crews and Mir residents spent the holiday aloft and in two cases, in 1982 and 2006, astronauts landed and launched on the day itself.

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